LIFE OF CHRIST SEMESTER 4
NT 244
Mark Moore
Office: 624-2518 x2711
Home: 782-8379
markmoore@occ.edu
http://markmoore.org

Sample Harmony

Notebook

Projects  | Schedule | Grades | Textbooks | Essential Reading | Course Objectives | Class Policies


Course Description: Semester four covers the passion through the ascension. It includes the last supper, arrest, crucifixion, and resurrection. Major sermons: prediction of Jerusalem’s destruction (Matt. 24) and the farewell discourse (Jn. 13-17). Students will concentrate on understanding the meaning of Jesus' death, resurrection, and return.


PROJECTS:
  1. Harmonies (10 points): You will turn in a harmony for each section that is in bold on the daily schedule [there are 13 highlighted giving you a potential of three extra credit points]. Follow the following format. (A) Each gospel will be recorded word for word in its own column but positioned so that parallel words and phrases are matched across the columns. Color coding to show important similarities or differences is encouraged. (B) Each section will be followed by two paragraphs: (i) Make note of distinctive words or phrases that one writer uses that the others do not. If these are important editorial changes or theological emphases for that author explain why they are important or how they affect the understanding of the passage? (ii) How does this pericope fit into its own context in each gospel? What comes before it and what comes after it? And does this arrangement of the material affect the understanding of this text? Several sample harmonies can be found at: http://markmoore.org/classes/loc/harmony.html. A collection of them is kept on reserve at the Seth Wilson Library.

  2. Memory (15 Points): There are three passages assigned to be memorized verbatim and written out in class on the day they are assigned: John 15, John 17, and Mark 16. [As an alternative to the final exam, a student may write out (and grade) John 14-17]. Count off 1 point for every word left out, for every extra word included and every time words are transposed. Count of 2 points for every verse or phrase that is misplaced. This is not an exact science but do your best and be as honest as possible, we will check it over ourselves when we receive them. Be sure to write the total number missed at the top of your paper.

  3. Paper (15 points): Each student will write an exegetical term paper over one of the passages listed in the schedule. Your paper must be 2,800-3,500 words including the table of contents and bibliography with 10-15 cited references. Use footnotes. A Term paper guide is available in the bookstore or online here.

  4. Reading (10 points): There will be a 10 point quiz over N.T. Wright’s book, Justification on 10/5. Another 10 point quiz on 11/29 will cover two online readings: (a) “Did Jesus Really Rise from the Dead?” at http://markmoore.org, then click on “resources” then “essays” as well as (b) At http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/religion/jesus/ read the ten brief articles under “The Testimony”. For three extra credit points, the student can turn in a two-page book report on LaVoi’s Unlocking the Secrets of the Shroud, on 11/1

  5. Extra Credit (2 points): Prepare a chart of all the prophecies Jesus fulfilled during the last week of his life (including the resurrection), arranged chronologically.  It should have four columns to it: (1) N.T. verse(s), (2) O.T. verse(s), (3) Verses in the context of the O.T. that also apply to the fulfillment, (4) brief description of the N.T. fulfillment.  (Due on 12/2)


SCHEDULE: 

Date

Topic

Assignment

Date

Topic

Assignment

8/23

Destruction of Jer.

 

10/18

155

 

8/24

Destruction of Jer.

 

10/19

156

 

8/25

139a

 

10/20

157-158

 

8/26

139b

 

10/21

159

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8/30

139c

 

10/25

160

 

8/31

139de

 

10/26

161

 

9/1

139f

 

10/27

162

 

9/2

139f

 

10/28

163

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9/6

139g

 

11/1

164

Lavoie

9/7

140-142

 

11/2

164

 

9/8

143-144

 

11/3

165-166

 

9/9

145

 

11/4

167

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9/13

146

 

11/8

168

Term Paper

9/14

148

 

11/9

169-171

 

9/15

147

 

11/10

Theology of the Resurrection

9/16

TEST #1

 

11/11

TEST #3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9/20

149

 

11/15

172

 

9/21

149

 

11/16

173-174

 

9/22

150a

 

11/17

175

 

9/23

Memory: John 15

 

11/18

Memory: Mark 16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9/27

Special Study

 

11/22

Thanksgiving

 

9/28

150b

 

11/23

Thanksgiving

 

9/29

150c

 

11/24

Thanksgiving

 

9/30

150de

 

11/25

Thanksgiving

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10/4

151

 

11/29

176-177

Articles

10/5

151

Wright

11/30

178-179

 

10/6

152

 

12/1

180

 

10/7

Memory: John 17

 

12/2

181

Proph. Chart

 

 

 

 

 

 

10/11

153

 

12/6

182-183

 

10/12

Holy Spirit in Acts

 

12/7

184

 

10/13

TEST #2

 

12/8

TEST #4

 

10/14

154

 

12/9

Christ in Culture

 


GRADES:

Harmonies 10%; Memory 15 %; Paper 15 %; Readings 10 %; Tests 40 %; Final (Bring a Scantron) 10 %


TEXTBOOKS:

Lavoie, Gilbert. Resurrected. Allen, TX: Thomas More, 1998. [Optional]

Wright, N. T. Justification: God's Plan and Paul's Vision. Downers Grove: IVP, 2009.

Moore, M. The Chronological Life of Christ. Joplin, MO: College Press, 1996.

Thomas, R. & Gundry, S. The NIV Harmony of the Gospels. San Francisco: Harper & Row, 1988.


ESSENTIAL READING IN THE LIFE OF CHRIST
  1. Aland, K. Synopsis of the Four Gospels UBS, 1972. (A harmony of the Gospels with Greek and English on facing pages.)

  2. Brown, R. E. The Birth of the Messiah: A Commentary on the Infancy Narrative. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1977. (A massive and valuable scholarly work from a liberal Catholic perspective.)

  3. ---. The Death of the Messiah: From Gethsemane to the Grave: A Commentary on the Passion Narrative in the Four Gospels. New York: Doubleday, 1994. (A massive and valuable scholarly work from a liberal Catholic perspective.)

  4. Bruce, F. F. The Hard Sayings of Jesus. Downer’s Grove, IL: IVP, 1983. (He gives great clarity with brief comments to the more difficult sayings of Jesus.)

  5. Bultmann, R. History of the Synoptic Tradition, Tr. John Marsh. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 1963. (This is the classic form-critical analysis of the gospel texts. Brilliant compilation and categorization of source material from a very liberal perspective. Conclusions are overdrawn).

  6. Edersheim, Alfred. The Life and Times of Jesus the Messiah. Mclean, VI: Macdonald, 1883. (Old classic on the harmony of Jesus’ life from a converted Jew. An immense amount of dated, but still somewhat valuable information from Jewish literature pertaining to the gospels).

  7. Evans, Craig & Porter, Stanley (Eds.). Dictionary of New Testament Backgrounds. Downer’s Grove, IL: IVP, 2000. (This is an invaluable collection of encyclopedic essays on cultural and historical backgrounds, essential for understanding the first century world of Jesus).

  8. Ferguson, E. Backgrounds of Early Christianity. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1987. (This is not primarily a work on the Gospels but provides an immense wealth of historical information on the 1st century era.)

  9. Ford, David & Mike Higton (Eds.). Jesus. Oxford: Oxford, 2002. (This is a reader on Jesus, with historic quotations under a variety of topics from throughout church history. Magnificent reading).

  10. Foster, R. C. Studies in the Life of Christ. Joplin, MO: College Press, 1995. (This is a commentary on the harmony of the Life of Christ. Done primarily in the 40's, it wrestles with the liberalism of its day, particularly source, form and redaction criticism. An invaluable resource).

  11. Green Joel B.; McKnight, Scot; and Marshall, I. H. Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels. Downer’s Grove: InterVarsity Press, 1992. (This is a gold mine of conservative scholarship on a wide variety of issues from the Gospels).

  12. Linnemann, Eta. Is There a Synoptic Problem? Grand Rapids: Baker, 1992. (As a former disciple of Bultmann, this German scholar argues persuasively with page after page of primary data, that there is no literary evidence of significant textual borrowing among the synoptics).

  13. Manning, Brennan. The Signature of Jesus. Portland, OR: Multnomah, 1992. (This devotional work from a Catholic perspective analyzes the core value of Jesus — abandonment through cross-bearing and what that looks like in Christians today.)

  14. Moore, Mark. The Chronological Life of Christ (2 Vols). Joplin, MO: College Press, 1996. (A contemporary commentary on the Harmony of Jesus’ life from one really swell fellow!).

  15. Neyrey, Jerome H. The Social World of Luke-Acts: Models for Interpretation. Peabody, Mass: Hendrickson Publishers, 1991. (This is not a commentary but an analysis of the social structures of the Mediterranean culture of Jesus’ day. This is a very helpful guide to issues such as shame-honor and patron-client, locating Jesus’ teaching in his broader culture.)

  16. Sanders, E. P. Jesus and Judaism. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1985. (While he minimizes the tension between Jesus and the Pharisees, Sanders correctly locates Jesus and his aims within his own Jewish milieu).

  17. Shepard, J. W. The Christ of the Gospels. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1939. (A dated but classic work on the Harmony of Jesus’ Life).

  18. Strobel, Lee. A Case for Christ. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1998. (A user friendly guide to an apologetic of Jesus).

  19. Thomas & Gundry. A Harmony of the Gospels. San Francisco: Harper Collins, 1978. (A workable harmony in English with helpful articles in the back on critical issues. Comes in NASB and NIV).

  20. Wenham, J. Easter Enigma. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker, 1984. (He shows reasonable explanations to the critics’ accusation that the resurrection accounts are irreconcilable).

  21. Wilkins, M. & Moreland, J. Jesus Under Fire. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1995. (A scholarly response to the Jesus Seminar).

  22. Witherington, Ben. The Many Faces of the Christ: The Christologies of the New Testament and Beyond. New York: Crossroad Publishing, 1998. (He traces the development of Christology through the gospels and the rest of the N.T.)

  23. Wright, N.T. Jesus and the Victory of God. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1996. (A careful argument for the political aims of Jesus, located within his Jewish. For a brief popular version, see The Original Jesus, also Eerdmans, 1996).

  24. ---. The Original Jesus. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1996. (A popular presentation of Wrights view of Jesus as a political Messiah).

  25. ---. The Resurrection of the Son of God. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2003. (A massive and critically important analysis of the resurrection of Jesus.)

  26. Yancey, Philip. The Jesus I Never Knew. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1995. (From an evangelical perspective, Yancey tries to paint a portrait of Jesus that he would agree with and say, “Yes, that truly is who I am.”)

College Mission: The ultimate mission of Ozark Christian College is to glorify God by seeking the evangelization of the lost and the edification of Christians worldwide. The immediate mission of Ozark Christian College is to train men and women for Christian service through an undergraduate Bible college education.

College Learning Objectives (CLO)

This course most directly addresses CLO 1, 3, 4, 6, and 7.

Ozark Christian College seeks to develop students who:

  1. Know sound doctrine from the Word of God. (Biblical Doctrine)

  2. Understand evidences for the basis of faith in Christ and the Bible.  (Apologetics)  

  3. Interpret the Bible to understand the author's intended meaning. (Hermeneutics

  4. Demonstrate an intellectual development for critical thinking and lifelong learning. (Intellect)

  5. Communicate effectively in written and oral forms. (Communication)

  6. Display a personal growth in Christian character and fellowship with Christ. (Devotion)

  7. Apply a variety of skills for leading others to Christ, helping them mature in Christ, and equipping them to serve Christ. (Evangelism & Discipleship)

Biblical Studies Area Objectives (BSAO):

This course most directly addresses BSAO 1, 3, 5, 6.

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the history of the Old Testament and New Testament.

  2. Document how the Old Testament scriptures reveal God’s preparation for the coming of the Messiah.

  3. Articulate basic Christian doctrine through exegetical study of the scriptures.         

  4. Understand issues dealing with the origin, interpretation and application of the Bible.

  5. Articulate a strong faith in Jesus as the Son of God and the Bible as the Word of God.

  6. Apply Biblical texts to life.

Course Objectives

Upon completion of this course, a student should be able to:

  1. Learn the big picture of Jesus' life and ministry. This includes locating major events, understanding the basic geography, scope and purpose of Jesus' ministry. [CLO 1 & 6 and BSAO 1 & 5]

  2. Study in depth the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus. [CLO 1 & 6 and BSAO 1 & 5]

  3. Gain insight into the four gospels by studying them chronologically, side by side.  To learn the relationships between the four gospels and how to fairly and appropriately weave them together. [CLO  1, 3, & 4 and BSAO 1, 3, 4, & 5]

  4. Know Jesus and to deepen our trust in Him--to grow in love, faith and obedience to the Master. [CLO 4, 6, & 7 BSAO 5 & 6]

  5. Apply the principles of the Kingdom of God to today's culture. [CLO  4, 6, & 7 and BSAO 5 & 6]


CLASS POLICIES:

  1. ADA Accommodation: If you have a disability and are requesting an accommodation, please contact the Executive Director of Admissions at 417-624-2518 Extension 2006 as soon as possible.

  2. Attendance: Absences over 8 will result in the failure of this course as outlined in the college catalogue (page 53-4). Four tardies will be counted as one absence. If a student arrives fifteen minutes after class or leaves fifteen minutes before class is over it will be counted as an absence. 

  3. Homework: Late work is unacceptable. Assignments and projects are due at the beginning of the class period on which they are assigned.  If you are absent, you are still responsible for having your work brought to class and turned in for you. All work is to be typed unless otherwise noted.

  4. Tests: Should you miss an exam you will take a different exam and you will have exactly one week to make it up from the class period on which it was given. You may take it at the testing center (L12) after paying a $5 late fee in the business office.

  5. Papers must follow the guidelines of the Term Paper Guide which can be purchased in the Bookstore. End notes are not acceptable for this class. I urge you to get a tutoring appointment in The Learning Center. I tend to like courier font.

  6. Cheating/Plagiarism: Cheating will result in a zero on the assignment in question and a mandatory meeting with the dean of students to determine further discipline which may include failure in the class or dismissal from the college. Cheating  includes but is not limited to (1) using material from another student for tests, memory, or term papers, (2) not properly citing sources in papers and assignments so as to make it look original, (3) using cheat sheets – written or electronic – for tests or quizzes.





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